How To Enjoy Getting Your Exercise

Are you annoyed by people who seem to enjoy exercise? What about people who eat healthfully with little effort? Why is it so easy for them and such a struggle for you? One simple reason could be time.

The longer you follow healthy behaviors, the easier they become and the best part is, you actually start to enjoy them. Your first step in getting to that happy place is to change your attitude.

The Party Isn’t Over

What does a healthy lifestyle look like?

For some people, it looks like a lifestyle without any kind of fun. You have to slog through boring workouts, avoid going out to restaurants and eat twigs and berries. What kind of fun is that?

At first, it may look like you have to give up everything to lose weight, but what you gain from those changes is much more meaningful and satisfying. Not only will your body change, but your mind will change as well.

What to Enjoy About Healthy Eating

Here’s what will happen if you keep maintaining that healthy diet:

Your priorities change. The way your body feels after a healthy meal will become more important to you than the instant pleasure of having something loaded with fat or sugar.

You’ll enjoy healthy food. You can live without chips and Cokes and you’ll gladly give those things up once you experience how your body feels after healthier meals.

You’ll still enjoy your favorite foods. The only difference is the frequency. Now, instead of having it several times a week, you might indulge once or twice a month.

You’ll get rid of the guilt. By not indulging every time you want a treat, you’ll savor it even more.

You’ll see food in a different light. Food becomes fuel rather than something that controls your life. If you exercise, you’ll learn very quickly how food affects your workouts. Eating a heavy, fatty meal makes you tired and your workouts suffer. Soon, you’ll want better workouts which will motivate you to eat better.

You’ll become more adventurous. Eating healthy often opens the door to more options than you usually give yourself. You’ll try new vegetables and grains and experiment with herbs and flavors you’ve never tried.

Your friends and family will benefit. Even if you’re the only one eating healthy, those habits rub off on others. Being a good role model for your kids or co-workers is one way to teach them how to live healthily.

You’ll have tools to deal with temptation. Healthy eaters are much better at avoiding the usual pitfalls like party foods or overloaded buffets. They make an effort to eat regular meals so they’re not starving, fill up on healthy foods first to eat less of the bad stuff, and choose a few quality treats to enjoy instead of everything in front of them.

These changes come over time, sometimes weeks, months or years of slowly working on your habits and choices. Allowing yourself this time is crucial for permanently changing how you look at food and healthy eating.

The positive changes don’t just end there. Your feelings and perspective on exercise change as well.

What to Enjoy About Regular Exercise

If you’re new to exercise, it may not cross your mind that working out is something you’ll look forward to.

During the first few weeks of exercise, your body and mind may rebel against your new workouts and you may wonder if you’ll ever get the hang of it.

Like healthy eating, however, exercise actually becomes easier over time and, eventually, you even look forward to it. Here’s what can happen when you make exercise a regular part of your life:

You’ll start to appreciate your body. It doesn’t take much time to see improvements in strength and endurance when you start exercising. As you feel that strength grow, you may get excited about your workouts, wondering how much you’ll lift next time or how fast you’ll walk or run.

Everything gets easier. Carrying groceries, taking care of kids, going up and down stairs – all of these things get easier and you may even get more done with your new found energy.

Your confidence grows. The more you work your body, the more your body can do and following through on your exercise goals lets you know you can trust yourself. That self-trust is a key ingredient to a healthy life.

You’ll try things you never imagined. I’ve seen my clients go from being couch potatoes to running races, hiking up mountains and just enjoying life more. The stronger you get, the more confidence you’ll have to branch out.

You’ll be inspired to change other areas of your life. This is exemplified by one of my clients in his 40s. When I met him, he worked up to 16 hours a day. As he started exercising, he looked at other bad habits that affected his energy and stress levels. He cut his hours, hired more people and started to enjoy his family and his life.

Your health improves. Exercise can help with diabetes, heart disease, depression, anxiety and high cholesterol, as well as protect your body from some types of cancer.
Your sex life gets better. Studies have shown that exercisers have more satisfying sex lives than non-exercisers.

Your children will have a better chance at being healthy. As with healthy eating, being a good role model when it comes to being active gives your kids the know-how to be active themselves.

You’ll have more energy. You ‘ll be more alert, focused and an annoyance to all those people in the office who are dragging towards the end of the day.

What’s in store for you, if you keep trying your best, is a better life. It may not seem that way in the beginning, which is one reason many people quit before they experience these changes.

Any new lifestyle change can seem overwhelming at first, but there is a secret to staying on track: Take it one day at a time, one healthy choice at a time.

Stay with it and you’ll finally see the bright side of exercise.

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Black Ice Cream: A Treat for Detoxification (RECIPE)

Black ice cream: an activated charcoal treat for detoxification

You may have noticed a new food trend recently: black everything. From dark lemonades to coal-like pizza crusts, darkened foods are popping up everywhere. What’s giving these foods their dark hue is activated charcoal, and, I have to admit, it’s a fad I’m into.

And it’s not because of the color — activated charcoal is a terrific, natural way to rid your body of toxins. One of my new favorite ways to ingest activated charcoal is through ice cream. That’s right, black ice cream is a thing; it tastes good, and it’s good for you!

What Is Black Ice Cream?

Black ice cream is just a simple ice cream recipe that incorporates activated charcoal. My black ice cream recipe is also made from ingredients that you likely have on hand: canned coconut milk, condensed coconut milk, arrowroot starch, vanilla extract, cacao powder and, of course, charcoal.

As you can tell from the ingredients list, not only is this activated charcoal ice cream super healthy, it’s also dairy-free! You can even swap the honey for an alternative sweetener like maple syrup to make this black charcoal recipe vegan, too.

Black Ice Cream Health Benefits

Now, when you think of ice cream, “healthy” probably isn’t the first word that comes to mind. But the ingredients in this activated charcoal ice cream make it a guilt-free treat.

Let’s start with the main ingredient: activated charcoal. It’s a powerful detoxifier that’s often used in hospitals to treat patients who have overdosed or poisoned themselves. (1)

The charcoal binds to toxins and chemicals and draws them out of the body. The best types are made from coconut shells or identified wood species with fine grains and don’t have added artificial sweeteners.

Activated charcoal is handy to have in the medicine cabinet as it helps alleviate gas and bloating and can even help the morning after too many cocktails. (2) You can use it to whiten your teeth; in fact, you’ll find it in many natural toothpastes. It also promotes a happy digestive tract.

One of the most versatile kitchen staples, coconut milk, is featured in this black ice cream recipe. Coconut milk gives this dessert a creamy texture and a little natural sweetness. It’s also known to lower bad cholesterol levels and help you lose fat. (34)

Cacao powder is a type of dark chocolate, so it’s packed with antioxidants. In fact, dark chocolate is often considered a superfood and helps lower blood pressure and increases blood flow to the heart. (5)

And instead of refined sweeteners, this black ice cream recipe uses honey, a natural sweetener option. Honey is full of enzymes, antioxidants and minerals that you just don’t get with table sugar. It’s also a lot easier on your blood sugar levels.

Black Ice Cream Nutrition Facts

Activated charcoal has no calorie count, but how does the rest of this black ice cream stack up? One serving contains about: (6)

  • 271 calories
  • 33 grams carbohydrates
  • 13 grams fat
  • 12 grams protein
  • 180 grams sodium
  • 7 grams sugar

How to Make Black Ice Cream

Intrigued about making this activated charcoal ice cream? It’s pretty easy to do, so let’s get churning.

You’ll want to pre-plan this charcoal recipe and stick your ice cream maker’s freezer bowl in the freezer for about 9 hours; I find it’s easier to just place it overnight.

The next day, put a medium saucepan on the stove and add the coconut milk, condensed coconut milk, arrowroot starch, honey, vanilla extract, cacao powder and activated charcoal. Keep watch over it so it doesn’t come to a boil.

Next, pour the black ice cream mixture into a bowl. Cover it and place in the refrigerator for at least an hour before making the ice cream.

Assemble the ice cream maker and turn on the rotating freezer bowl. Next, pour the black ice cream mixture into the bowl and churn for 15–20 minutes or until the ice cream reaches your desired consistency.

If you’re a fan of thick ice cream, pour the mixture into a container. Cover it with parchment paper and store in the freezer for about an hour.

Then scoop the ice cream into a bowl. Serve the black charcoal ice cream with your favorite toppings.

I chose pistachios and Himalayan pink salt. Enjoy!

 

Today’s Recipe

Black Ice Cream: An Activated Charcoal Treat for Detoxification

TOTAL TIME: PREP: 15 MINUTES; TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR AND 15 MINUTES

SERVES: 4–6

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 cups full-fat coconut milk
  • 2 cups condensed coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3–4 tablespoons activated charcoal powder
  • 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Freeze the freezer bowl for at least 9 hours, or overnight.
  2. In a medium-size saucepan, on medium-low, mix milk, condensed milk, starch, honey, vanilla extract and cacao powder. Don’t let this mixture come to a boil.
  3. Pour mixture into a bowl, cover and place in the fridge for at least 1 hour before making ice cream.
  4. Assemble ice cream maker and turn on the rotating freezer bowl.
  5. Pour ice cream mixture into the freezer bowl and allow to churn for 15–20 minutes or until desired consistency.
  6. If you like your ice cream thick, pour the mixture into a container, cover with parchment paper and store in the freezer for about 1 hour.
  7. Serve with your favorite ice cream toppings.

The Best Way to Wash Fruits and Vegetables

The Best Way to Wash Fruits and Vegetables

How might we reduce our exposure to pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables? What about staying away from imported produce? Well, it turns out domestic produce may be even worse, dispelling the notion that imported fruits and vegetables pose greater potential health risks to consumers.

Buying organic dramatically reduces dietary exposure to pesticides, but it does not eliminate the potential risk. Pesticide residues are detectable in about one in ten organic crop samples, due to cross-contamination from neighboring fields, the continued presence of very persistent pesticides like DDT in the soil, and accidental or fraudulent use.

By choosing organic, one hopes to shift exposures from a range of uncertain risk to more of a range of negligible risk, but even if all we had to eat were the most pesticide-laden of conventional produce, there is a clear consensus in the scientific community that the health benefits from consuming fruits and vegetables outweigh any potential risks from pesticide residues. And, we can easily reduce whatever risk there is by rinsing our fruits and vegetables under running water.

There is, however, a plethora of products alleged by advertisers to reduce fruit and produce pesticide residues more effectively than water and touted to concerned consumers. For example, Procter & Gamble introduced a fruit and vegetable wash. As part of the introduction, T.G.I. Friday’s jumped on board bragging on their menus that the cheese and bacon puddles they call potato skins were first washed with the new product. After all, it was proclaimed proven to be 98% more effective than water in removing pesticides.

So researchers put it to the test, and it did no better than plain tap water.

Shortly thereafter, Procter & Gamble discontinued the product, but numerous others took its place claiming their vegetable washes are three, four, five, or even ten times more effective than water, to which a researcher replied, “That’s mathematically impossible.” If water removes 50%, you can’t take off ten times more than 50%. They actually found water removed up to 80% of pesticide residues like the fungicide, Captan, for example. So, for veggie washes to brag they are three, four, five, ten times better than water is indeed mathematically questionable.

Other fruit and vegetable washes have since been put to the test. Researchers compared FIT Fruit & Vegetable Wash, Organiclean, Vegi-Clean, and dishwashing soap to just rinsing in plain tap water. 196 samples of lettuce, strawberries, and tomatoes were tested, and researchers found little or no difference between just rinsing with tap water compared to any of the veggie washes (or the dish soap). They all just seemed like a waste of money. The researchers concluded that just the mechanical action of rubbing the produce under tap water seemed to do it, and that using detergents or fruit and vegetable washes do not enhance the removal of pesticide residues from produce above that of just rinsing with tap water alone.

That may not be saying much, though. Captan appears to be the exception. When plain water was tried against a half dozen other pesticides, less than half the residues were removed.

Fingernail polish remover works better, but the goal is to end up with a less toxic, not a more toxic tomato.

We need a straightforward, plausible, and safe method for enhanced pesticide removal. Is there anything we can add to the water to boost its pesticide-stripping abilities? Check out my video, How to Make Your Own Fruit & Vegetable Wash.

If you soak potatoes in water, between about 2% to 13% of the pesticides are removed, but a 5% acetic acid solution removes up to 100%. What’s that? Plain white vinegar. But 5% is full strength.

What about diluted vinegar?  Diluted vinegar only seemed marginally better than tap water for removing pesticide residues. Using full strength vinegar would get expensive, though. Thankfully there’s something cheaper that works even better: salt water.

A 10% salt solution appears to work as good or better than full-strength vinegar. To make a 10% salt solution, you just have to mix up about one-part salt to nine-parts water (though make sure to rinse all of the salt off before eating!).

There’s not much you can do for the pesticides in animal products, though. The top sources of some pesticides are fruits and vegetables; but for other pesticides, it’s dairy, eggs, and meat because the chemicals build up in fat. What do you do about pesticides in animal products? Hard boiling eggs appears to destroy more pesticides than scrambling, but for the pesticides that build up in the fat of fishes and chickens, cooking can sometimes increase pesticide levels that obviously can’t just wash off. In fact, washing meat, poultry, or eggs is considered one of the top ten dangerous food safety mistakes.

Read More at the Source: NutritionFacts.org